Student Development Practices

Student development practices emphasize life, employment, and occupational skill development through school-based and work-based learning experiences. Student assessment and accommodations provide a fundamental basis for student development resulting in successful transitions. (Kohler and Field, 2003)

Critical components of student development practices:

  1. Transition assessment data discussed in #2 is routinely used to develop the IEP.
  2. IEP teams gather and use transition assessment data beyond that noted in #2, on an as-needed basis. This includes, but is not limited to academic, cognitive, career/occupational, adaptive behavior, and related services data.
  3. Support services (e.g., environmental adaptations, accommodations, related services such as AT/OT/etc.) are clearly relevant to achievement of post-school goals.
  4. Related services and support services explicitly foster students’ skill development and achievement of post-school goals (e.g., environmental adaptations, accommodations, related services such as AT/OT/etc.).
  5. Staff and students are specifically trained on the use of the student’s assistive technology.

Rev. 2/10/2016

All students, including students at-risk and students with IEPs, are able to:
  1. Have access to school-based, extracurricular activities that develop social, emotional, and physical health and wellness, etc., of the student’s choosing.
  2. Take part in assessments of college, career, and independent living readiness (e.g., academic, cognitive, career/occupational, adaptive behavior) that is routinely collected and used to inform student-focused planning.
  3. Acquire academic skills appropriate to support postsecondary goals through direct instruction and/or added support, as necessary.
  4. Acquire skills for independent living development through direct instruction and/or added support, as necessary.
  5. Develop employment and occupational skills, including paid work experience, through direct instruction and/or added support, as necessary.
  6. Acquire the skills, behaviors, and attitudes, through direct instruction and/or added support, as necessary, that enable them to learn and grow in self-knowledge, social interactions, physical and emotional health, and self-determination.
In addition, when a student has an IEP:

The Next Steps NH Transition-Focused Education Framework is for students with IEPs and students at risk.  It is based on the five practices of the Kohler Taxonomy:

  1. Student-Focused Planning Practices
  2. Student Development Practices
  3. Interagency Collaboration Practices
  4. Family Involvement Practices
  5. Program Structures Practices

Kohler, P. D., & Field, S. (2003). Transition-focused education: foundation for the future. Journal of Special Education, 37(3), 174-183.