Student Development Practices

Student development practices emphasize life, employment, and occupational skill development through school-based and work-based learning experiences. Student assessment and accommodations provide a fundamental basis for student development resulting in successful transitions. (Kohler and Field, 2003)

Critical components of student development practices:

All students, including students at-risk and students with IEPs, are able to:

  • Have access to school-based, extracurricular activities that develop social, emotional, and physical health and wellness, etc., of the student’s choosing.
  • Take part in assessments of college, career, and independent living readiness (e.g., academic, cognitive, career/occupational, adaptive behavior) that is routinely collected and used to inform student-focused planning.
  • Acquire academic skills appropriate to support postsecondary goals through direct instruction and/or added support, as necessary.
  • Acquire skills for independent living development through direct instruction and/or added support, as necessary.
  • Develop employment and occupational skills, including paid work experience, through direct instruction and/or added support, as necessary.
  • Acquire the skills, behaviors, and attitudes, through direct instruction and/or added support, as necessary, that enable them to learn and grow in self-knowledge, social interactions, physical and emotional health, and self-determination.

In addition, when a student has an IEP:

  • Transition assessment data discussed in #2 is routinely used to develop the IEP.
  • IEP teams gather and use transition assessment data beyond that noted in #2, on an as-needed basis. This includes, but is not limited to academic, cognitive, career/occupational, adaptive behavior, and related services data.
  • Support services (e.g., environmental adaptations, accommodations, related services such as AT/OT/etc.) are clearly relevant to achievement of post-school goals.
  • Related services and support services explicitly foster students’ skill development and achievement of post-school goals (e.g., environmental adaptations, accommodations, related services such as AT/OT/etc.).
  • Staff and students are specifically trained on the use of the student’s assistive technology.

Rev. 2/10/2016

The Next Steps NH Transition-Focused Education Framework is for students with IEPs and students at risk.  It is based on the five practices of the Kohler Taxonomy:

  1. Student-Focused Planning Practices
  2. Student Development Practices
  3. Interagency Collaboration Practices
  4. Family Involvement Practices
  5. Program Structures Practices

Kohler, P. D., & Field, S. (2003). Transition-focused education: foundation for the future. Journal of Special Education, 37(3), 174-183.